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Your results for travelling to 'Malaysia': 35 results

Malaysia

Malaysia
  • Capital

    Capital

    Kuala Lumpur

  • Local time

    Local time

    17:28

  • Population

    Population

    32.27 m

  • Driving side

    Driving side

    Left

  • Calling code

    Calling code

    +60

  • Currency

    Currency

    RM MYR (ringgit)

Read more facts about Malaysia
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Malaysia

Malaysia
Socket
  • Capital

    Capital

    Kuala Lumpur

  • Local time

    Local time

    17:28

  • Population

    Population

    32.27 m

  • Driving side

    Driving side

    Left

  • Calling code

    Calling code

    +60

  • Currency

    Currency

    RM MYR (ringgit)

  • Average Salary

    Average Salary

    $ 913

  • Petrol price

    Petrol price

    € 0.68 pl

  • Precipitation

    Precipitation

    2 875mm /year

Geography & travel

  • Country Area

    Country Area

    329 750 km2

  • Protected Area

    Protected Area

    18%

  • Forest Area

    Forest Area

    68%

  • Agricultural area

    Agricultural area

    23%

  • Railways

    Railways

    2250km

  • Annual air passengers

    Annual air passengers

    53.82 m

Population

  • Ethnicity

    Ethnicity

    Malay
    Chinese - 23 %
    indigenous - 11 %

  • Religion

    Religion

    Muslim
    Muslim
    Buddhist

  • Literacy rates

    Literacy rates

    93.1%

  • Languages

    Languages

    Bahasa Malaysia
    English
    Chinese - Cantonese

  • Armed Forces

    Armed Forces

    133 600

  • Alcohol consumption

    Alcohol consumption

    1.7 l/person

  • Smoking

    Smoking

    43%

  • Diabetes

    Diabetes

    17.9%

  • Malaria

    Malaria

    2%

  • Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis

    89 per 100k

  • HIV

    HIV

    0.4%

Economy

  • Industries

    Industries

    rubber and palm oil, petroleum and natural gas, light manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, medical technology, electronics and semi-conductors, timber processing, Sabah - logging, petroleum and gas

  • Agriculture

    Agriculture

    palm oil, rubber, cocoa, rice, palm oil, subsistence crops, rubber, timber, palm oil

  • Natural Resources

    Natural Resources

    tin, petroleum, timber, copper, iron ore, natural gas, bauxite

  • Energy Import

    Energy Import

    -5%

  • Natural Resources

    Natural Resources

    tin, petroleum, timber, copper, iron ore, natural gas, bauxite

  • Renewable Energy

    Renewable Energy

    4%

  • CO2 Emissions

    CO2 Emissions

    242 821kt

  • Ease of Business

    Ease of Business

    24 (Best=1, Worst=200)

  • ATMs per 100k people

    ATMs per 100k people

    51

Back to results

What not to do when visiting Malaysia

1/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't be offended if your offer of a handshake is not reciprocated by a Muslim of opposite sex. In Islam, physical contact between the opposite sex is discouraged.

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2/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't kiss in public. Public behaviour is important in Malaysian culture and most Malaysians refrain from displaying affection such as embracing or kissing in public.

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3/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don't forget to enter the shrine with your left foot first, and exit by leading with your right foot. This gesture symbolically represents a whole.

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Did you know

Did you know?

Malaysia is home to the tallest twin buildings in the world, the Petronas Towers. The second tallest were the twin towers in NYC before their destruction.

4/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don’t point only with your finger - people beckon one another by extending an arm and making a scratching motion with their fingers. Using the thumb with the rest of your fingers clenched in the fist is acceptable.

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5/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't touch the head of adult. Touching people on the head is considered rude.

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6/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't pound your fist into the palm of the other hand - it's obscene gesture to some people.

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7/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t mess up the greetings - Chinese make a light handshake, sometimes accompanied with a touch on the arm. Malay men will use the handshake and also the salaam accompanied with a slight bow. Indian men will use the handshake and also the namaste. People often use a two-handed handshake when greeting and departing. Many times a simple nod or slight bow is enough. Wait for the women to initiate with all three ethnicities.

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8/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't ever touch or hand a monk something if you are a woman. Even accidentally brushing against their robes requires that they fast and perform a cleansing ritual.

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9/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't enter Malaysian home, temple, mosque or religious buildings without removing your shoes.

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10/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't use the left hand when eating or handing/receiving things - use right hand. It's considered discourteous in Malay custom to use your left hand when you hand over or receive things.

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11/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't drink alcohol everywhere - the country's large Muslim population don't drink alcohol.

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12/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't bath naked. You can wear hot pants and vests at mainland beaches if you are female. Topless swimming is a no-no. Malay women usually go swimming fully dressed and some keep their scarves on.

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13/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't be embarrassed for burping during the meal. Burping and belching after the meal is not very acceptable though.

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14/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't get involved in illegal drugs. There is a mandatory death penalty for trafficking.

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15/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don't discuss ethnic relations or the political system - they are both sensitive subjects.

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16/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t forget there are three major ethnicities - Chinese, Malay and Indian. Greetings tend to differ between the three.

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17/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t expect locals to be direct communicators - they avoid answering ”no" and rather say ”maybe” or ”no problem" even the answer is really no. Sucking the air between the teeth after a question is asked is a definite signal for no.

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18/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don't forget to convert most of your currency in Malaysia. There is restriction of bringing large amounts of ringgit into or out of the country.

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Tell us your experience

Tell us your experience

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19/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don't forget - bowing when passing someone means "excuse me".

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20/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't forget the cameras, watches, pens, portable radios, perfume, cosmetics and lighters are duty-free in Malaysia. If you are bringing in dutiable goods then a deposit may be required for temporary importation, which would be refundable on departure.

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21/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't show the soles of your feet or shoes to someone, even when sitting.

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22/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Street & Behavioral

Don't lose the temper and cause "loss of face". The concept of "saving face" is extremely important in East Asian social relationships.

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23/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t be surprised by periods of silence in conversations - it’s acceptable and sometimes expected, especially after a question is asked.

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24/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Business & Communication

Don't provide your passport as collateral when hiring vehicles - better use cash as deposit.

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25/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t distribute religious literature of another faith to Malaysian Muslims - it’s illegal.

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26/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t touch different genres when conversing.

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27/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Street & Behavioral

Don't be too affectionate in public - kissing, cuddling and similar behaviour are frowned upon if in public, especially amongst older locals.

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28/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Business & Communication

Don't pull the motorbike in the middle of the road when trying to turn right as you might be hit from behind or from the front by others. Most of the traffic accidents are caused by this as it's common vehicles are overtaking within each of the sides in parallel and stopping in the middle can cause you big troubles.

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29/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Business & Communication

Don't point at people or things with your feet - it's considered very rude as the feet are considered as the most inferior parts of the human body.

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30/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don’t be a victim of mosquito-borne diseases - protect yourself against bites by mosquitoes.

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31/35
Marker Malaysia
Street & Behavioral

Don't forget the air quality can occasionally be “unhealthy” due to burning vegetation in nearby countries, especially from March through June and in September/October.

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32/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Street & Behavioral

Don't show disrespect to Buddha or its images - large or small, ruined or not, it's regarded as a sacred object.

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33/35
Marker Malaysia
Business & Communication

Don’t forget the monsoon season takes place between October and February.

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34/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Business & Communication

Don't try to outrun the rainstorm on your moped.

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Tell us your experience

Tell us your experience

We love to hear from people who have travelled the world and know ‘what not to do’. Why not help other people on their travels?

Submit your story

35/35
Marker South-Eastern Asia
Street & Behavioral

Don't touch a monk. Treat monks with the highest respect. Buddhist monks are forbidden to touch or be touched by a woman, or to accept anything from the hand of woman.

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